Developer Interview: 10 Questions for Tomas Rawlings / Red Wasp Design

By Fred On 18 Dec, 2011 At 03:07 AM | Categorized As Interviews
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“Red Wasp …” I’ve got to confess, that I’ve just looked it up, because I didn’t know the word “Wasp” and I’m quite shocked by this company name: “Wespen” (that’s the German word for these critters) are possibly the #1 reason why the number of those leaving the Church has shown a marked increase… or do you think that an intelligent (and good!) creator is behind those little monsters, who ruins every picnic?

All joking apart, I’m pretty sure, that “Red Wasp Design” won’t ruin anything, quite the contrary: It looks like we’ve got a bunch of young and sympathetic developers here, who will enrich the world of Android Games with some Cthulhu-esk inputs. “Cthulhu”, just another word, that I’ve got to look up and I’m glad, that you can’t hear me trying to pronounce it. Alright then, I’m going to improve my English and you’ve got to read this developer interview.  Have fun!

 

10 Questions for Tomas Rawlings / Red Wasp Design

1. Please introduce yourself.

We’re Red Wasp Design. We’re a new games studio based in Bristol, UK (the home of Bansky graffiti, old school pirates and trip-hop.) You can find out more about us here; redwaspdesign.com

2. What made you want to be a game developer?

Playing games! We all grew up playing games and so the idea of making games came naturally.

3. What platforms do you develop games for and why?

Currently we’re developing for iOS and Android, but we’re really interested in other platforms. We’ve worked on plenty of games (at other companies) on PC, PSP and PS3, so have made games beyond mobile and want to work there again. Put simply, if its a good platform for games, we’re interested in developing for it.

4. What are your experiences in porting games between two platforms?

We’ve all worked on the Savage Moon games for Sony; which started on Playstation3 and then on a version for PSP – though in the design of this we made sure that it was not really a port, but a reinvention of the game, so it is fitted for the platform. As we’ve all worked in the games industry for years, doing multi-platform is pretty common, so our work-flows are geared towards this.

5. How do you get inspiration for a game?

From everywhere and anything. In the case of the Cthulhu Christmas Calendar, Mike (our coder) had done an advent calendar before and given we were working on a Call of Cthulhu game, it seemed natural to mashup the two. For our main project at the moment, Call of Cthulhu: The Wasted Land, the designer Tomas, has been a huge fan of Lovecraft and the RPG his work inspired for many, many years.

6. How long does it take for you to write a game from start to finish?

Depends on the game. Call of Cthulhu: The Wasted Land will have taken us about a year by the time its finished, but then its a project we really care about, so we’re not rushing it at all. Its more important to us to get it right than to get it out soon.

7. What are the biggest technical challenges when you develop a game?

Squeezing the most out of the game platform. We’re always looking to put more graphics, more effects, more audio and more animations into the game. As such, we aim to squeeze every drop of processing power we can get towards running the game. This does make the development take much longer (see above) for example to do this how we wanted to, we’ve developed our own 3D technology, but the results, we hope will be worth the effort.

8. What do you think the future of gaming will look like?

Gaming is splitting into tiers; for both console and mobile there will be layers of game types based on the development costs. So from the huge $200+ million titles like GTA or Modern Warfare to tiny single-developer projects. The smart phone has opened gaming up, so there is so much more going on than before. This means there is a lot more creativity and experimentation (good) but also much more ‘me too’ type games (not so good). One thing is certain; its a great time to be a gamer, with so many games and so many platforms competing for your attention!

9. What is your favourite game at the moment and why?

We’ve been playing Modern Warfare 3 – especially on the co-op mode; great way to relax after a long day’s development. Also enjoying Mecho Wars on Mobile.

10. What is your advice for new developers?

Don’t follow the crowd; just because all other games are going free-to-play or FPS, does not mean you have to. Do what suits your vision of the game. Ultimately, you have to make games that you’d want to play. (Tomas wrote a series of articles about starting a new games studio that might be of interest, on the creative side, the business side and the marketing).